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Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2018 Feb;36(1):61-84. doi: 10.1016/j.emc.2017.08.006.

Airway Management in Trauma.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Medical Education, Dalhousie University, 3rd Floor, HI Site, Suite 355, Room 364D, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3A7, Canada; Department of Anaesthesia, Division of Medical Education, Dalhousie University, 3rd Floor, HI Site, Suite 355, Room 364D, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3A7, Canada; Department of Medical Neurosciences, Division of Medical Education, Dalhousie University, 3rd Floor, HI Site, Suite 355, Room 364D, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3A7, Canada; Charles V. Keating Trauma & Emergency Centre, QEII Health Sciences Centre, 1799 Robie Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3G1, Canada. Electronic address: gkovacs@dal.ca.
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Medical Education, Dalhousie University, 3rd Floor, HI Site, Suite 355, Room 364D, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3A7, Canada; Charles V. Keating Trauma & Emergency Centre, QEII Health Sciences Centre, 1799 Robie Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3G1, Canada.

Abstract

Airway management in the trauma patient presents numerous unique challenges beyond placement of an endotracheal tube and outcomes are dependent on the provider's ability to anticipate difficulty. Airway management strategies for the care of the polytrauma patient are reviewed, with specific considerations for those presenting with traumatic brain injury, suspected c-spine injury, the contaminated airway, the agitated trauma patient, maxillofacial trauma, and the traumatized airway. An approach to airway management that considers the potential anatomic and physiologic challenges in caring for these complicated trauma patients is presented.

KEYWORDS:

Airway; Airway management; Trauma

PMID:
29132582
DOI:
10.1016/j.emc.2017.08.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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