Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2018 Feb;36(1):181-202. doi: 10.1016/j.emc.2017.08.013.

Management of Major Vascular Injuries: Neck, Extremities, and Other Things that Bleed.

Author information

1
Trauma Services, Department of Emergency Medicine, Kingston General Hospital, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 2V7, Canada. Electronic address: c.evans@queensu.ca.
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 2V7, Canada.
3
Division of Vascular Surgery, Kingston General Hospital, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 2V7, Canada.

Abstract

Vascular injuries represent a significant burden of mortality and disability. Blunt injuries to the neck vessels can present with signs of stroke either immediately or in a delayed fashion. Most injuries are detected with computed tomography angiography and managed with either antiplatelet medications or anticoagulation. In contrast, patients with penetrating injuries to the neck vessels require airway management, hemorrhage control, and damage control resuscitation before surgical repair. The keys to diagnosis and management of peripheral vascular injury include early recognition of the injury; hemorrhage control with direct pressure, packing, or tourniquets; and urgent surgical consultation.

KEYWORDS:

Blunt cerebrovascular; Computed tomography angiography; Neck trauma; Tourniquet; Vascular injury; Vascular trauma

PMID:
29132576
DOI:
10.1016/j.emc.2017.08.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center