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J Affect Disord. 2018 Feb;227:323-329. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2017.11.001. Epub 2017 Nov 3.

Alcohol-induced disinhibition is associated with impulsivity, depression, and suicide attempt: A nationwide community sample of Korean adults.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Depression Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Depression Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; Korean Psychological Autopsy Center (KPAC), Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University, College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
4
Depression Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.
5
Department of Physiology, Single Cell Network Research Center, Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Suwon, South Korea.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Depression Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; Korean Psychological Autopsy Center (KPAC), Seoul, Republic of Korea; Depression Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA; Department of Health Sciences & Technology, Department of Medical Device Management & Research, and Department of Clinical Research Design & Evaluation, Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences & Technology (SAIHST), Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: jeonhj@skku.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Alcohol-induced disinhibition (AID) is defined as a "loss of restraint over some form of behavior after drinking alcohol regardless of its amount". Although many previous studies have investigated on alcohol use disorder and suicide attempt, few studies have focused on AID and suicide.

METHODS:

A total of 9461 adults who had a history of drinking completed a face-to-face interview using the Korean version of Composite International Diagnostic Interview (K-CIDI) with the Suicide Module, and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale 11 (BIS-11). In this study, we defined the AID group as those who had been involved with the two antisocial behaviors, including fights, being arrested or dangerous driving, according to the K-CIDI.

RESULTS:

Among 9461 subjects, 564 were classified as the AID group (5.96%). The AID group had a significantly higher number of lifetime suicidal ideation, plan, attempt, and multiple attempts, and higher BIS-11 scores than non-AID group. The total scores of BIS-11 of the AID group reported the highest score compared with other psychiatric disorders. The AID group experienced more frequently three types of alcohol withdrawal symptoms, including nervousness, heart beating fast, and feeling weak. Compared with subjects without both AID and MDD, subjects with both AID and MDD showed significant association with a lifetime suicide attempt (AOR = 6.86, p < 0.001) and showed stronger association with multiple attempts (AOR = 10.38, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

AID was associated with suicide attempt and impulsivity, and the both AID and MDD showed much stronger association with lifetime suicide attempt and multiple attempts.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol-induce disinhibition; Impulsivity; Major depressive disorder; Suicide attempt

PMID:
29132075
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2017.11.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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