Format

Send to

Choose Destination
FEBS J. 2018 Feb;285(4):654-664. doi: 10.1111/febs.14325. Epub 2017 Nov 24.

Innate and acquired immune surveillance in the postdissemination phase of metastasis.

Author information

1
Department of Anatomy and the Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Abstract

Metastasis is responsible for the majority of death in cancer patients. Of the different steps in the metastasis cascade, the postdissemination phase is perhaps one of the least understood. Many factors, both from the disseminated tumor cells and the microenvironment, impact the success of the metastatic outgrowth. In this article, we discuss the interactions between colonizing cancer cells and immune cells in the period between vascular arrest in a secondary organ and metastatic outgrowth. We address the ambiguity in the findings of current research regarding the role of immune cells in regulating the metastatic microenvironment, and their hand in determining cancer cell fate.

KEYWORDS:

disseminated tumor cells; extracellular matrix; immune evasion; metastasis-associated immune cells; metastatic colonization; organ-specific; patient-derived xenograft; tumor dormancy; tumor microenvironment

PMID:
29131550
PMCID:
PMC5826884
[Available on 2019-02-01]
DOI:
10.1111/febs.14325

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center