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Aust J Rural Health. 2018 Feb;26(1):56-62. doi: 10.1111/ajr.12392. Epub 2017 Nov 13.

Stage of diagnosis of prostate, breast and colorectal cancer in farm residents compared with other rural and urban residents in New South Wales.

Author information

1
Australian Centre for Agricultural Health and Safety, The University of Sydney, Moree, New South Wales, Australia.
2
National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
3
School of Population Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
4
School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if stage at diagnosis of prostate, breast and colorectal cancers differs between farm, rural non-farm and urban residents.

DESIGN:

Data linkage of baseline survey information from a large cohort study, with state cancer registry records from 2006 to 2009.

SETTING:

New South Wales, Australia.

PARTICIPANTS:

New South Wales residents enrolled in the 45 and Up Study cohort.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Adjusted odds ratio of non-localised cancer stage was modelled using binary logistic regression, controlling for commonly known cancer risk factors.

RESULTS:

Overall differences in the odds ratios for later stage prostate, breast and colorectal cancer diagnosis in farm men and women compared with rural non-farm and urban counterparts were not statistically significant, although farm men had twice the odds of either group of being diagnosed at later stage colorectal cancer. The odds of later stage prostate cancer for farm and urban men were similar, but rural non-farm men were significantly less likely than urban men to be diagnosed at later stage. Higher household income was associated with later stage breast and prostate cancer; and private health insurance with extras was negatively associated with later stage prostate cancer.

CONCLUSIONS:

Differences in stage of cancer diagnosis, particularly between farm and rural non-farm men, remain unexplained but were not statistically significant. Farm men may be at higher risk of later stage colorectal cancer diagnosis, which if confirmed has implications for research on possible reasons, and for the delivery of appropriate cancer diagnostic services in rural areas.

KEYWORDS:

epidemiology; research; rural health services delivery; rural oncology; rural population health

PMID:
29131425
DOI:
10.1111/ajr.12392
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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