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Cell Metab. 2018 Jan 9;27(1):85-100.e8. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2017.10.006. Epub 2017 Nov 9.

CD38-NAD+Axis Regulates Immunotherapeutic Anti-Tumor T Cell Response.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.
2
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.
3
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.
4
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.
5
Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.
6
Department of Ophthalmology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.
7
Department of Public Health, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.
8
Department of Nephrology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.
9
Department of Surgery, Loyola University, Maywood, IL 60153, USA.
10
Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, VA 23005, USA.
11
Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.
12
Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. Electronic address: mehrotr@musc.edu.

Abstract

Heightened effector function and prolonged persistence, the key attributes of Th1 and Th17 cells, respectively, are key features of potent anti-tumor T cells. Here, we established ex vivo culture conditions to generate hybrid Th1/17 cells, which persisted long-term in vivo while maintaining their effector function. Using transcriptomics and metabolic profiling approaches, we showed that the enhanced anti-tumor property of Th1/17 cells was dependent on the increased NAD+-dependent activity of the histone deacetylase Sirt1. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Sirt1 activity impaired the anti-tumor potential of Th1/17 cells. Importantly, T cells with reduced surface expression of the NADase CD38 exhibited intrinsically higher NAD+, enhanced oxidative phosphorylation, higher glutaminolysis, and altered mitochondrial dynamics that vastly improved tumor control. Lastly, blocking CD38 expression improved tumor control even when using Th0 anti-tumor T cells. Thus, strategies targeting the CD38-NAD+ axis could increase the efficacy of anti-tumor adoptive T cell therapy.

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