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Virology. 2018 Jan 15;514:9-17. doi: 10.1016/j.virol.2017.11.001. Epub 2017 Nov 10.

Discovery of novel anelloviruses in small mammals expands the host range and diversity of the Anelloviridae.

Author information

1
Virology Research Center, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, United Kingdom. Electronic address: wmarciel@usp.br.
2
Virology Research Center, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil.
3
Laboratory Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
4
Virology Research Center, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil; Department of Microbiology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
5
MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
6
Divisão Técnica de Medicina Veterinária e Manejo da Fauna Silvestre, Prefeitura de São Paulo, Brazil.
7
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, São Paulo State University, Araçatuba, Brazil.
8
Center for Technological Innovations, Evandro Chagas Institute, Ministry of Health, Ananindeua, Pará, Brazil; Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA.

Abstract

The Anelloviridae comprises single-stranded DNA viruses currently grouped in sixty-eight species classified in twelve genera. They have been found in many vertebrate hosts including primates. In this study, we describe the application of the high-throughput sequencing to examine the frequency and diversity of anelloviruses in rodents, bats and opossums captured in São Paulo State, Brazil. We report a total of twenty-six anelloviruses with sixteen nearly complete genomes and ten partial genomes, which include eleven potential novel species identified in rodents (Cricetidae), bats (Molossidae and Phyllostomidae), and opossums (Didelphidae). We also propose the inclusion of two potential new genera within the Anelloviridae family, provisionally named Omegatorquevirus and Sigmatorquevirus, including six and three novel species of anelloviruses, respectively. In summary, this study expands the diversity and the host range of the known anelloviruses.

KEYWORDS:

Anelloviridae; Anellovirus; Bat-borne virus; Rodent-borne virus; Virome, and ssDNA viruses

PMID:
29128758
DOI:
10.1016/j.virol.2017.11.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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