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Addict Behav. 2018 Mar;78:80-84. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.11.002. Epub 2017 Nov 9.

Prevalence and motives for drugged driving among emerging adults presenting to an emergency department.

Author information

1
University of Michigan Addiction Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan School of Medicine, 4250 Plymouth Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States; University of Michigan Injury Center, University of Michigan School of Medicine, 2800 Plymouth Road, NCRC10-G080, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States. Electronic address: erinbona@med.umich.edu.
2
University of Michigan Addiction Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan School of Medicine, 4250 Plymouth Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States.
3
University of Michigan Injury Center, University of Michigan School of Medicine, 2800 Plymouth Road, NCRC10-G080, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States; Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Michigan School of Medicine, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States; Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights 3790A SPHI, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States; Hurley Medical Center, 1 Hurley Plaza, Flint, MI 48503, United States.
4
University of Michigan Addiction Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan School of Medicine, 4250 Plymouth Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States; VA Center for Clinical Management Research, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, 2215 Fuller Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, United States.
5
Department of Community Health and Health Behavior, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260, United States.
6
University of Michigan Addiction Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan School of Medicine, 4250 Plymouth Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States; University of Michigan Injury Center, University of Michigan School of Medicine, 2800 Plymouth Road, NCRC10-G080, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Drugged driving [DD] is a public health concern, particularly among emerging adults who have the highest rates of drug use. Understanding involvement with DD could inform prevention efforts for this population. We evaluated the prevalence of, motives for, and correlates of past-year DD among emerging adults from an urban, under-resourced community.

METHODS:

Emerging adults (N=586) ages 18-25years (54% male, 56% African American, 34% European American) seeking care in an urban emergency department completed past-year surveys of demographics, frequency of DD within 4h of substance use, reasons for DD, and substance use.

RESULTS:

DD was reported by 24% of participants (with 25% of those engaging in high frequency DD). DD after cannabis use was most common (96%), followed by prescription opioids, sedatives, and stimulants (9%-19%). Common reasons for DD were: needing to go home (67%), not thinking drugs affected driving ability (44%), not having to drive far (33%), and not feeling high (32%). Demographics were not associated with DD, but, as expected, those with DD had riskier substance use.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this clinical sample, using a conservative measure, DD, particularly following cannabis use, was relatively common among emerging adults. Based on these data, clinical interventions for cannabis and other drug use should include content on prevention of DD, with particular attention to motives such as planning ahead for alternatives to get home safely and weighing benefits and risks of DD.

KEYWORDS:

Drug use; Emerging adults; Impaired driving

PMID:
29128710
PMCID:
PMC5783773
[Available on 2019-03-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.11.002

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