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Contemp Clin Trials. 2018 Jan;64:58-66. doi: 10.1016/j.cct.2017.11.006. Epub 2017 Nov 9.

Design and rationale of the medical students learning weight management counseling skills (MSWeight) group randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, United States. Electronic address: Judith.Ockene@umassmed.edu.
2
Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, United States. Electronic address: Karen.Ashe@umassmed.edu.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, 1200 East Broad Street, Richmond, VA 23298, United States. Electronic address: Rashelle.Hayes@vcuhealth.org.
4
Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, United States. Electronic address: Linda.Churchill@umassmed.edu.
5
Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, United States. Electronic address: Sybil.Crawford@umassmed.edu.
6
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States. Electronic address: ageller@hsph.harvard.edu.
7
Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, United States. Electronic address: Denise.Jolicoeur@umassmed.edu.
8
Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, United States. Electronic address: Barbara.Olendzki@umassmed.edu.
9
Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, United States. Electronic address: amaranthmd@gmail.com.
10
Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, United States. Electronic address: Jyothi.Pendharkar@umassmed.edu.
11
University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, OCRME, 1204 MEB, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States. Electronic address: kristi-ferguson@uiowa.edu.
12
Creighton University School of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, 2412 Cuming Street, Omaha, NE 68131, United States. Electronic address: TPGuck@Creighton.edu.
13
Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, 3451 Walnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States. Electronic address: Margok@uphs.upenn.edu.
14
Medstar Georgetown University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, 3800 Reservoir Road N.W., PHC 5, Washington, DC 20007, United States. Electronic address: CX03@gunet.georgetown.edu.
15
University of Louisville School of Medicine, 500 S Preston St, Louisville, KY 40202, United States. Electronic address: monica.shaw@louisville.edu.
16
University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Ave South, Webb 646, Birmingham, AL 35294-3360, United States. Electronic address: tsoleymani@smgnj.com.
17
Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, CR110, Portland, OR 97239, United States. Electronic address: stadlerd@ohsu.edu.
18
Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 222 Richmond St, Providence, RI 02903, United States. Electronic address: sarita_warrier@brown.edu.
19
Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, United States. Electronic address: Lori.Pbert@umassmed.edu.

Abstract

Physicians have an important role addressing the obesity epidemic. Lack of adequate teaching to provide weight management counseling (WMC) is cited as a reason for limited treatment. National guidelines have not been translated into an evidence-supported, competency-based curriculum in medical schools. Weight Management Counseling in Medical Schools: A Randomized Controlled Trial (MSWeight) is designed to determine if a multi-modal theoretically-guided WMC educational intervention improves observed counseling skills and secondarily improve perceived skills and self-efficacy among medical students compared to traditional education (TE). Eight U.S. medical schools were pair-matched and randomized in a group randomized controlled trial to evaluate whether a multi-modal education (MME) intervention compared to traditional education (TE) improves observed WMC skills. The MME intervention includes innovative components in years 1-3: a structured web-course; a role play exercise, WebPatientEncounter, and an enhanced outpatient internal medicine or family medicine clerkship. This evidence-supported curriculum uses the 5As framework to guide treatment and incorporates patient-centered counseling to engage the patient. The primary outcome is a comparison of scores on an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) WMC case among third year medical students. The secondary outcome compares changes in scores of medical students from their first to third year on an assessment of perceived WMC skills and self-efficacy. MSWeight is the first RCT in medical schools to evaluate whether interventions integrated into the curriculum improve medical students' WMC skills. If this educational approach for teaching WMC is effective, feasible and acceptable it can affect how medical schools integrate WMC teaching into their curriculum.

KEYWORDS:

5As; Group randomized controlled trial; Medical education; Medical schools; Patient-centered counseling; Weight management counseling

PMID:
29128651
PMCID:
PMC5745008
[Available on 2019-01-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.cct.2017.11.006

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