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J Chem Neuroanat. 2018 Apr;89:69-72. doi: 10.1016/j.jchemneu.2017.11.007. Epub 2017 Nov 8.

A strategic plan to identify key neurophysiological mechanisms and brain circuits in autism.

Author information

1
UMR INSERM U930, Team Autism, "Centre Universitaire de Pédopsychiatrie", CHRU de Tours, 37044 Tours cedex 9, France. Electronic address: frederique.brilhault@univ-tours.fr.
2
UMR INSERM U930, Team Autism, "Centre Universitaire de Pédopsychiatrie", CHRU de Tours, 37044 Tours cedex 9, France.

Abstract

Autism and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) cover a large variety of clinical profiles which share two main dimensions: social and communication impairment and repetitive behaviors or restricted interests, which are present during childhood. There is now no doubt that genetic factors are a major component in the etiology of autism but precise physiopathological pathways are still being investigated. Furthermore, developmental trajectories combined with compensatory mechanisms will lead to various clinical and neurophysiological profiles which together constitute this Autism Spectrum Disorder. To better understand the pathophysiology of autism, comprehension of key neurophysiological mechanisms and brain circuits underlying the different bioclinical profiles is thus crucial. To achieve this goal we propose a strategy which investigates different levels of information processing from sensory perception to complex cognitive processing, taking into account the complexity of the stimulus and whether it is social or non-social in nature. In order to identify different developmental trajectories and to take into account compensatory mechanisms, we further propose that such protocols should be carried out in individuals from childhood to adulthood representing a wide variety of clinical forms.

KEYWORDS:

Autism spectrum disorder; Neurodevelopment; Neurophysiological mechanisms; Research strategy

PMID:
29128349
DOI:
10.1016/j.jchemneu.2017.11.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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