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Clin Colorectal Cancer. 2018 Mar;17(1):73-79. doi: 10.1016/j.clcc.2017.10.010. Epub 2017 Oct 23.

Molecular Profiling of Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer: Princess Margaret Cancer Centre Experience.

Author information

1
Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada; Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
2
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada.
3
Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
4
Department of Medicine, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
5
Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada; Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. Electronic address: eric.chen@uhn.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Molecular aberrations in KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA have been well-described in advanced colorectal cancer. The incidences of other mutations are less known. We report results of molecular profiling of advanced colorectal cancer in an academic cancer center.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Patients with advanced colorectal were enrolled in an institution-wide molecular profiling program. Profiling was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded archival tissues using a customized MassArray panel (23 genes, 279 mutations) or the Illumina MiSeq TruSeq Cancer Panel (48 genes, 212 amplicons, ≥ 500× coverage) in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified laboratory. PTEN was determined by immunohistochemistry.

RESULTS:

From March 2012 to April 2014, 245 patients were enrolled. At least one mutation was found in 54% (97/178) and 91% (61/67) of patients using MassArray or MiSeq platforms, respectively (P < .01). Of all patients, KRAS G12/13 mutation was identified in 39%, and non-G12/13 KRAS, BRAF, or NRAS mutations were present in 9%, 6%, and 4%, respectively. Other common mutations included TP53 (68.7%), APC (41.8%), and PIK3CA (13.5%). Co-mutation with KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF was found in 75% of patients with PIK3CA mutation. Of 106 patients with known PTEN immunohistochemistry status, 16% were negative. A higher average number of mutations were observed in right versus left colorectal cancer (P < .01), with 13 of 14 BRAF mutations located in right colon cancer.

CONCLUSION:

Mutations are common in advanced colorectal cancer. Right colon cancers harbor more genetic aberrations than left colon or rectal cancers. These aberrations may contribute to differential outcomes to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy among patients with right colon, left colon, or rectal cancers.

KEYWORDS:

BRAF; Genomic profiling; KRAS; Mutation; Right colon cancer

PMID:
29128266
DOI:
10.1016/j.clcc.2017.10.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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