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Clin Chest Med. 2017 Dec;38(4):655-666. doi: 10.1016/j.ccm.2017.07.006. Epub 2017 Sep 19.

Extracorporeal Life Support in Lung Transplantation.

Author information

1
Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, PH 8E, Room 101, New York, NY 10032, USA.
2
Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, PH 14E, Room 104, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: sa2059@cumc.columbia.edu.

Abstract

Extracorporeal life support in lung transplantation has been associated with poor posttransplant outcomes. However, recent advances have resulted in more favorable posttransplant outcomes. The increased use of this technology must be weighed against the risks inherent in its use, especially when complications arising in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)-dependent patients result in loss of transplant candidacy, leaving them with no viable alternative for long-term support. Existing and emerging data support the judicious use of this technology in carefully selected patients at high-volume transplant and ECMO centers that prioritize minimization of sedation, avoidance of endotracheal intubation, and early mobilization.

KEYWORDS:

Bridge to transplant; Cardiopulmonary bypass; ECMO; Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation; Lung transplantation; Mechanical ventilation; Primary graft dysfunction

PMID:
29128016
DOI:
10.1016/j.ccm.2017.07.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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