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Addict Behav. 2018 Mar;78:74-79. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.10.008. Epub 2017 Oct 14.

E-cigarette marketing exposure and combustible tobacco use among adolescents in the United States.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Robert Stempel College of Public Health & Social Work, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA. Electronic address: rehab.auf@fiu.edu.
2
Department of Epidemiology, Robert Stempel College of Public Health & Social Work, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA; Center for Research on U.S. Latino HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse [CRUSADA], Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA.
3
Jackson South Community Hospital, Miami, FL 33176, USA.
4
Department of Epidemiology, Robert Stempel College of Public Health & Social Work, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA.
5
Center for Research on U.S. Latino HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse [CRUSADA], Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA; School of Social Work, Robert Stempel College of Public Health & Social Work, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA.

Abstract

E-cigarette advertising has been shown to be associated with use of e-cigarettes, but its association with tobacco use has not been studied. Therefore, we examined the association between e-cigarettes advertisement and tobacco use. Data from nationally representative 22,007 middle and high school students (grades 6-12) were used to conduct the analysis. Logistic regression models estimated the adjusted odds ratios (AOR) of ever and current use of cigarette, hookah, cigar, and polytobacco use. Odds ratios were weighted and adjusted for study design, non-response rates, school level, gender, race/ethnicity, e-cigarette use, and smoking at home. E-cigarette marketing exposure was significantly associated with ever use of cigarettes (AOR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1-1.5), hookah (AOR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.2-1.7), cigars (AOR: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.4-1.6), and polytobacco (AOR: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.5-1.8). Likewise, E-cigarette marketing exposure was significantly associated with current use of cigarettes (AOR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1-1.6), hookah (AOR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.03-1.7), cigars (AOR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1-1.6), and polytobacco use (AOR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.5-2.1). The results suggest that e-cigarette advertisement is associated with use of cigarettes, hookah, cigars, and polytobacco products. These results add to the evidence about the risks of e-cigarette marketing and highlight the need for stricter regulation of e-cigarette advertisements.

KEYWORDS:

Cigar; E-cigarette; Electronic cigarettes; Hookah; Marketing; Smoking; Tobacco use; Waterpipe

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