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Addict Behav. 2018 Mar;78:51-58. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.10.017. Epub 2017 Nov 8.

Social media e-cigarette exposure and e-cigarette expectancies and use among young adults.

Author information

1
Cancer Prevention in the Pacific Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 701 Ilalo St., Honolulu, HI 96813, USA. Electronic address: ppokhrel@cc.hawaii.edu.
2
Center for the Study of Tobacco, Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, Fay W. Boozman College of Public Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham, #820, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA.
3
Cancer Prevention in the Pacific Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 701 Ilalo St., Honolulu, HI 96813, USA.
4
Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 1240 N 10th St., Milwaukee, WI 53205, USA.
5
School of Communications, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2550 Campus Road, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA.
6
Cancer Prevention in the Pacific Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 701 Ilalo St., Honolulu, HI 96813, USA; Department of Communocology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2560 Campus Road, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA.
7
Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, 2001 N. Soto St., Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA.

Abstract

A vast majority of U.S. young adults use social media such as Facebook and Instagram daily. Research suggests that young adults are commonly exposed to e-cigarette-related marketing or user-generated content on the social media they use. Currently, however, there is limited empirical evidence as to how social media e-cigarette exposure is associated with e-cigarette use beliefs and behavior. In particular, limited evidence exists to support the proposition that social media e-cigarette exposure is uniquely associated with e-cigarette use, even after adjusting for the effects of e-cigarette use in young adults' in-person or 'offline' social networks. This study was conducted to test the hypotheses that 1) social media e-cigarette exposure is associated with e-cigarette use outcome expectancies and current e-cigarette use; and 2) the association between social media and e-cigarette use is linked via outcome expectancies. We collected cross-sectional data from a sample of 470 young adult college students in Hawaii. Hypotheses were tested by fitting a structural equation model to the data. The model accounted for the associations of demographic variables, cigarette smoking history, as well as e-cigarette use in individuals' actual social networks with expectancies and behavior. Results indicated that social media e-cigarette exposure was associated with current e-cigarette use indirectly through two of the four positive outcome expectancies examined, namely, positive "smoking" experience and positive sensory experience. We discuss the implications of the findings in the context of tobacco control efforts.

KEYWORDS:

E-cigarettes; Expectancies; Social media; Young adults

PMID:
29127784
PMCID:
PMC5783750
DOI:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.10.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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