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Sci Rep. 2017 Nov 10;7(1):15328. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-15751-5.

Diagnostic value of blood-derived microRNAs for schizophrenia: results of a meta-analysis and validation.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, First Hospital/First Clinical Medical College of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, 030001, P. R. China.
2
Multi-Disciplinary Team (MDT) Center for Cognitive Impairment and Sleep Disorders, First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, 030001, P. R. China.
3
Wuxi Mental Health Center, Wuxi, 214000, P. R. China.
4
The First Psychiatric Hospital of Harbin, Harbin, 150056, P. R. China.
5
Unit on Statistical Genomics, Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
6
Depression Treatment Center, Beijing Anding Hospital of Capital Medical University, Beijing, 100088, P. R. China.
7
Institute of Mental Health, Peking University Sixth Hospital, Peking University, Beijing, 100191, P. R. China. dryue@bjmu.edu.cn.
8
Institute of Mental Health, Peking University Sixth Hospital, Peking University, Beijing, 100191, P. R. China.
9
Department of Psychiatry, First Hospital/First Clinical Medical College of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, 030001, P. R. China. xuyongsmu@vip.163.com.
10
Multi-Disciplinary Team (MDT) Center for Cognitive Impairment and Sleep Disorders, First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, 030001, P. R. China. xuyongsmu@vip.163.com.

Abstract

There is an increasing interest in searching biomarkers for schizophrenia (SZ) diagnosis, which overcomes the drawbacks inherent with the subjective diagnostic methods. MicroRNA (miRNA) fingerprints have been explored for disease diagnosis. We performed a meta-analysis to examine miRNA diagnostic value for SZ and further validated the meta-analysis results. Using following terms: schizophrenia/SZ, microRNA/miRNA, diagnosis, sensitivity and specificity, we searched databases restricted to English language and reviewed all articles published from January 1990 to October 2016. All extracted data were statistically analyzed and the results were further validated with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) isolated from patients and healthy controls using RT-qPCR and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. A total of 6 studies involving 330 patients and 202 healthy controls were included for meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic odds ratio were 0.81 (95% CI: 0.75-0.86), 0.81 (95% CI: 0.72-0.88) and 18 (95% CI: 9-34), respectively; the positive and negative likelihood ratio was 4.3 and 0.24 respectively; the area under the curve in summary ROC was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.84-0.90). Validation revealed that miR-181b-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-195-5p, miR-137, miR-346 and miR-34a-5p in PBMNCs had high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in the context of schizophrenia. In conclusion, blood-derived miRNAs might be promising biomarkers for SZ diagnosis.

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