Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Psychol Rev. 2018 Feb;59:52-60. doi: 10.1016/j.cpr.2017.10.011. Epub 2017 Nov 8.

Mindfulness-based interventions for psychiatric disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA, USA; Center for Healthy Minds, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI, USA; Department of Counseling Psychology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI, USA. Electronic address: sbgoldberg@wisc.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.
3
VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA, USA.
4
Center for Healthy Minds, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI, USA; Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
5
Department of Counseling Psychology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI, USA; Modum Bad Psychiatric Center, Vikersund, Norway.
6
VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA, USA; Center for Excellence in Substance Abuse Treatment and Education, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA, USA.

Abstract

Despite widespread scientific and popular interest in mindfulness-based interventions, questions regarding the empirical status of these treatments remain. We sought to examine the efficacy of mindfulness-based interventions for clinical populations on disorder-specific symptoms. To address the question of relative efficacy, we coded the strength of the comparison group into five categories: no treatment, minimal treatment, non-specific active control, specific active control, and evidence-based treatment. A total of 142 non-overlapping samples and 12,005 participants were included. At post-treatment, mindfulness-based interventions were superior to no treatment (d=0.55), minimal treatment (d=0.37), non-specific active controls (d=0.35), and specific active controls (d=0.23). Mindfulness conditions did not differ from evidence-based treatments (d=-0.004). At follow-up, mindfulness-based interventions were superior to no treatment conditions (d=0.50), non-specific active controls (d=0.52), and specific active controls (d=0.29). Mindfulness conditions did not differ from minimal treatment conditions (d=0.38) and evidence-based treatments (d=0.09). Effects on specific disorder subgroups showed the most consistent evidence in support of mindfulness for depression, pain conditions, smoking, and addictive disorders. Results support the notion that mindfulness-based interventions hold promise as evidence-based treatments.

KEYWORDS:

Evidence-based treatments; Meditation; Meta-analysis; Mindfulness; Psychiatric disorders; Relative efficacy

PMID:
29126747
PMCID:
PMC5741505
DOI:
10.1016/j.cpr.2017.10.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center