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BMC Med Educ. 2017 Nov 10;17(1):199. doi: 10.1186/s12909-017-1033-x.

Perceptions of the 2011 ACGME duty hour requirements among residents in all core programs at a large academic medical center.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA. sandefur.benjamin@mayo.edu.
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA.
3
Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
4
Department of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) implemented revisions to resident duty hour requirements (DHRs) in 2011 to improve patient safety and resident well-being. Perceptions of DHRs have been reported to vary by training stage and specialty among internal medicine and general surgery residents. The authors explored perceptions of DHRs among all residents at a large academic medical center.

METHODS:

The authors administered an anonymous cross-sectional survey about DHRs to residents enrolled in all ACGME-accredited core residency programs at their institution. Residents were categorized as medical and pediatric, surgery, or other.

RESULTS:

In total, 736 residents representing 24 core specialty residency programs were surveyed. The authors received responses from 495 residents (67%). A majority reported satisfaction (78%) with DHRs and believed DHRs positively affect their training (73%). Residents in surgical specialties and in advanced stages of training were significantly less likely to view DHRs favorably. Most respondents believed fatigue contributes to errors (89%) and DHRs reduce both fatigue (80%) and performance of clinical duties while fatigued (74%). A minority of respondents (37%) believed that DHRs decrease medical errors. This finding may reflect beliefs that handovers contribute more to errors than fatigue (41%). Negative perceived effects included diminished patient familiarity and continuity of care (62%) and diminished clinical educational experiences for residents (41%).

CONCLUSIONS:

A majority of residents reported satisfaction with the 2011 DHRs, although satisfaction was significantly less among residents in surgical specialties and those in advanced stages of training.

KEYWORDS:

Duty hour; Fatigue; Medical education; Medical error; Resident perception; Work hour

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