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Eur J Nutr. 2017 Nov 9. doi: 10.1007/s00394-017-1575-z. [Epub ahead of print]

Tea and coffee consumption in relation to glioma: a case-control study.

Author information

1
Students' Scientific Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
2
Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 14155-6117, Tehran, Iran.
3
Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
4
Department of Neurosurgery, Loghman Hakim Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
5
Obesity and Eating Habits Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Molecular Cellular Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. a-esmaillzadeh@sina.tums.ac.ir.
6
Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 14155-6117, Tehran, Iran. a-esmaillzadeh@sina.tums.ac.ir.
7
Food Security Research Center, Department of Community Nutrition, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. a-esmaillzadeh@sina.tums.ac.ir.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Data on the link between tea and coffee consumption and risk of glioma are controversial. We aimed to examine the association between tea and coffee consumption and glioma in Iranian adults.

METHODS:

In this hospital-based case-control study, we enrolled 128 pathologically confirmed new cases of glioma and 256 age- and sex-matched controls. Dietary intakes of study participants including tea and coffee consumption was assessed using the validated Block-format 123-item semi-quantitative FFQ. Participants were categorized based on tertiles of tea and coffee consumption. Data on potential confounders were also collected through the use of pre-tested questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Individuals with the greatest tea consumption were less likely to have glioma compared with those with the lowest consumption (0.36; 0.20-0.68). This inverse association was not changed after controlling for energy intake. The association remained statistically significant even after taking other potential confounders, including dietary intakes of red and processed meats, legumes and nuts, fruits, salt and mutual effects of tea and coffee consumption, into account (0.33; 0.13-0.86). Additional adjustments for BMI did not alter the association. After controlling for potential confounders, including dietary intakes and BMI, coffee consumption was inversely associated with odds of glioma; such that individuals in the top category of coffee consumption were 91% less likely to have glioma compared with those in the bottom category (0.09; 0.03-0.24). Considering coffee and tea intake combined, those in the highest tertile were 65% less likely to have glioma compared with those in the lowest tertile (0.35; 0.15-0.83).

CONCLUSION:

We found an inverse association between tea and coffee consumption and odds of glioma, even after controlling for a wide range of confounders.

KEYWORDS:

Beverages; Brain tumor; Coffee; Glioma; Tea

PMID:
29124385
DOI:
10.1007/s00394-017-1575-z

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