Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Mol Genet Metab Rep. 2017 Oct 31;14:3-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ymgmr.2017.10.009. eCollection 2018 Mar.

A molecular analysis of the GAA gene and clinical spectrum in 38 patients with Pompe disease in Japan.

Author information

1
Division of Medical Genetics, National Center for Child Health and Development, 2-10-1 Okura, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 157-8535, Japan.
2
Department of Clinical Laboratory Medicine, National Center for Child Health and Development, 2-10-1 Okura, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 157-8535, Japan.
3
Division of General Pediatrics & Interdisciplinary Medicine, National Center for Child Health and Development, 2-10-1 Okura, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 157-8535, Japan.
4
Center for Lysosomal Storage Diseases, National Center for Child Health and Development, 2-10-1 Okura, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 157-8535, Japan.

Abstract

Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency, which results in the accumulation of glycogen in lysosomes in multiple tissues, including cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle cells. Thus far, 558 sequence variants of the GAA gene have been published in the Pompe Disease Mutation Database, and some mutations appear with considerable frequency in particular ethnic groups, such as Caucasians, Taiwanese, Chinese, and Koreans. However, the GAA mutation pattern in Japanese patients remains poorly understood. We analyzed the relationship between the genetic and clinical features of 38 mostly Japanese patients with Pompe disease from 35 unrelated families. We identified 28 different GAA gene mutations, including 7 novel mutations, by a GAA gene analysis. c.546G > T (22.9%) and c.1857C > G (14.3%) were the most common mutations and accounted for 37.1% of the total mutant alleles. In the six patients with infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD), c.1857C > G was also the most common mutation. In addition, there were 13 homozygotes (5 with the c.546G > T) among the 35 families, which is the highest frequency reported thus far. Regarding the initial symptoms, cardiomegaly was the most common (3/6 = 50%) in IOPD patients, while muscle weakness was observed the most frequently in patients with late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD) (15/30 = 50%). Notably, all IOPD patients who showed respiratory distress at the time of onset require respiratory assistance at present (4/4 = 100%). Regarding the presenting symptoms, cardiomegaly (6/6 = 100%) and hepatomegaly (4/6 = 66.7%) were more commonly seen in IOPD, and muscle weakness (24/29 = 82.7%) was observed more frequently in LOPD. Respiratory assistance is required at present in 33.3% of IOPD patients and 50% of LOPD patients, and 20% of IOPD patients and 29.6% of LOPD patients are wheelchair users. These individual clinical courses may be influenced by the timing of the diagnosis and treatment; for example, in 2007, an ERT orphan drug for treatment of Pompe disease, Alglucosidase alfa, was made available in Japan, and there were 5 (5/6 = 83.3%) wheelchair users diagnosed from 2008 to 2009 (cases 32-38) and 4 (4/27 = 14.8%) from 2010 to 2015 (cases 1-31). These findings underscore the importance of the early diagnosis and treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Acid α-glucosidase; Genotype-phenotype correlation; Lysosomal disease; Pompe disease

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center