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Science. 2017 Nov 10;358(6364):789-793. doi: 10.1126/science.aao2136.

Integrated view of Vibrio cholerae in the Americas.

Author information

1
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK. dd6@sanger.ac.uk nrt@sanger.ac.uk.
2
Institut Pasteur, Unité des Bactéries Pathogènes Entériques, Paris, 75015, France.
3
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK.
4
Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge CB2 0SP, UK.
5
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0ES, UK.
6
Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico, D.F., Mexico.
7
Institut Pasteur, Unité Biodiversité des Bactéries Pathogènes Emergentes, Paris, 75015, France.
8
Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada, Baja California, (CICESE), Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico.
9
Institut Pasteur, Plate-forme Génomique (PF1), Paris, 75015, France.
10
Centre for Genomic Pathogen Surveillance, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK.
11
Subsecretaría de Prevención y Promoción de la Salud, Secretaría de Salud, Ciudad de México, Mexico.
12
Enteric Diseases Laboratory Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
13
Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Infecciosas, ANLIS, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
14
Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico, D.F., Mexico.
15
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK.

Abstract

Latin America has experienced two of the largest cholera epidemics in modern history; one in 1991 and the other in 2010. However, confusion still surrounds the relationships between globally circulating pandemic Vibrio cholerae clones and local bacterial populations. We used whole-genome sequencing to characterize cholera across the Americas over a 40-year time span. We found that both epidemics were the result of intercontinental introductions of seventh pandemic El Tor V. cholerae and that at least seven lineages local to the Americas are associated with disease that differs epidemiologically from epidemic cholera. Our results consolidate historical accounts of pandemic cholera with data to show the importance of local lineages, presenting an integrated view of cholera that is important to the design of future disease control strategies.

PMID:
29123068
DOI:
10.1126/science.aao2136
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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