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Neurochem Int. 2018 Oct;119:178-183. doi: 10.1016/j.neuint.2017.11.003. Epub 2017 Nov 6.

Strong sonic hedgehog signaling in the mouse ventral spinal cord is not required for oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) generation but is necessary for correct timing of its generation.

Author information

1
Division of Neurobiology and Bioinformatics, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8787, Japan; Department of Physiological Sciences, School of Life Sciences, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193, Japan.
2
Department of Anatomy, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752, Republic of Korea; BK21 PLUS Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Anatomy, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752, Republic of Korea; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752, Republic of Korea; BK21 PLUS Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752, Republic of Korea.
4
Division of Neurobiology and Bioinformatics, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8787, Japan; Department of Physiological Sciences, School of Life Sciences, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193, Japan. Electronic address: ikenaka@nips.ac.jp.

Abstract

In the mouse neural tube, sonic hedgehog (Shh) secreted from the floor plate (FP) and the notochord (NC) regulates ventral patterning of the neural tube, and later is essential for the generation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). During early development, the NC is adjacent to the neural tube and induces ventral domains in it, including the FP. In the later stage of development, during gliogenesis in the spinal cord, the pMN domain receives strong Shh signaling input. While this is considered to be essential for the generation of OPCs, the actual role of this strong input in OPC generation remains unclear. Here we studied OPC generation in bromi mutant mice which show abnormal ciliary structure. Shh signaling occurs within cilia and has been reported to be weak in bromi mutants. At E11.5, accumulation of Patched1 mRNA, a Shh signaling reporter, is observed in the pMN domain of wild type but not bromi mutants, whereas expression of Gli1 mRNA, another Shh reporter, disappeared. Thus, Shh signaling input to the pMN domain at E12.5 was reduced in bromi mutant mice. In these mutants, induction of the FP structure was delayed and its size was reduced compared to wild type mice. Furthermore, while the p3 and pMN domains were induced, the length of the Nkx2.2-positive region and the number of Olig2-positive cells decreased. The number of OPCs was also significantly decreased in the E12.5 and E14.5 bromi mutant spinal cord. In contrast, motor neuron (MN) production, detected by HB9 expression, significantly increased. It is likely that the transition from MN production to OPC generation in the pMN domain is impaired in bromi mutant mice. These results suggest that strong Shh input to the pMN domain is not required for OPC generation but is essential for producing a sufficient number of OPCs.

KEYWORDS:

Bromi; Embryonic spinal cord; Floor plate; Oligodendrocyte; Sonic hedgehog signaling

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