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Br J Anaesth. 2017 Oct 1;119(4):616-625. doi: 10.1093/bja/aex231.

Continuing chronic beta-blockade in the acute phase of severe sepsis and septic shock is associated with decreased mortality rates up to 90 days.

Author information

1
Department of Anaesthesiology, University Hospital of Greifswald, Ferdinand-Sauerbruch-Strasse, 17475 Greifswald, Germany.
2
Institute of Bioinformatics, University Hospital of Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
3
Department of Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Nephrological, Anesthesiological and Geriatric Sciences, University of Rome, La Sapienza, Rome, Italy.

Abstract

Background:

There is growing evidence that beta-blockade may reduce mortality in selected patients with sepsis. However, it is unclear if a pre-existing, chronic oral beta-blocker therapy should be continued or discontinued during the acute phase of severe sepsis and septic shock.

Methods:

The present secondary analysis of a prospective observational single centre trial compared patient and treatment characteristics, length of stay and mortality rates between adult patients with severe sepsis or septic shock, in whom chronic beta-blocker therapy was continued or discontinued, respectively. The acute phase was defined as the period ranging from two days before to three days after disease onset. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was performed to compare survival outcomes in patients with pre-existing chronic beta-blockade.

Results:

A total of 296 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock and pre-existing, chronic oral beta-blocker therapy were included. Chronic beta-blocker medication was discontinued during the acute phase of sepsis in 129 patients and continued in 167 patients. Continuation of beta-blocker therapy was significantly associated with decreased hospital (P=0.03), 28-day (P=0.04) and 90-day mortality rates (40.7% vs 52.7%; P=0.046) in contrast to beta-blocker cessation. The differences in survival functions were validated by a Log-rank test (P=0.01). Multivariable analysis identified the continuation of chronic beta-blocker therapy as an independent predictor of improved survival rates (HR = 0.67, 95%-CI (0.48, 0.95), P=0.03).

Conclusions:

Continuing pre-existing chronic beta-blockade might be associated with decreased mortality rates up to 90 days in septic patients.

KEYWORDS:

adrenergic beta-antagonists; critical care outcomes; mortality; sepsis

PMID:
29121280
DOI:
10.1093/bja/aex231
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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