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Am J Audiol. 2017 Dec 12;26(4):531-542. doi: 10.1044/2017_AJA-17-0023.

The Effect of Adaptive Nonlinear Frequency Compression on Phoneme Perception.

Author information

1
Child Amplification Laboratory, National Centre for Audiology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
2
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Division of Communication Disorders, University Medicine of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany.
3
Phonak AG, Staefa, Switzerland.
4
Hearts for Hearing, Oklahoma City.

Abstract

Purpose:

This study implemented a fitting method, developed for use with frequency lowering hearing aids, across multiple testing sites, participants, and hearing aid conditions to evaluate speech perception with a novel type of frequency lowering.

Method:

A total of 8 participants, including children and young adults, participated in real-world hearing aid trials. A blinded crossover design, including posttrial withdrawal testing, was used to assess aided phoneme perception. The hearing aid conditions included adaptive nonlinear frequency compression (NFC), static NFC, and conventional processing.

Results:

Enabling either adaptive NFC or static NFC improved group-level detection and recognition results for some high-frequency phonemes, when compared with conventional processing. Mean results for the distinction component of the Phoneme Perception Test (Schmitt, Winkler, Boretzki, & Holube, 2016) were similar to those obtained with conventional processing.

Conclusions:

Findings suggest that both types of NFC tested in this study provided a similar amount of speech perception benefit, when compared with group-level performance with conventional hearing aid technology. Individual-level results are presented with discussion around patterns of results that differ from the group average.

PMID:
29121162
DOI:
10.1044/2017_AJA-17-0023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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