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Diabetologia. 2018 Feb;61(2):308-316. doi: 10.1007/s00125-017-4489-7. Epub 2017 Nov 9.

Dietary antioxidant capacity and risk of type 2 diabetes in the large prospective E3N-EPIC cohort.

Author information

1
Inserm U1018, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP) 'Health across Generations' Team, University Paris-Saclay, University Paris-Sud, Gustave Roussy, Espace Maurice Tubiana, 114 rue Edouard Vaillant, 94805, Villejuif Cedex, France.
2
Inserm U1018, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP) 'Renal and cardiovascular Epidemiology' Team, University Versailles, Saint Quentin, University Paris-Sud, Villejuif, France.
3
CHU Rennes, Université de Rennes 1, Department of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Nutrition, Rennes, France.
4
Inserm U1018, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP) 'Health across Generations' Team, University Paris-Saclay, University Paris-Sud, Gustave Roussy, Espace Maurice Tubiana, 114 rue Edouard Vaillant, 94805, Villejuif Cedex, France. marie-christine.boutron@gustaveroussy.fr.

Abstract

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS:

Recent evidence suggests that oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. The diet, and especially fruit and vegetables, contains a variety of compounds with antioxidant activity, which may have cumulative/synergistic antioxidant effects. The total antioxidant capacity, an index derived from dietary intake, is a single estimate of antioxidant capacity from all dietary antioxidants. The main aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between total antioxidant capacity and risk of type 2 diabetes.

METHODS:

Among 64,223 women (mean age 52 ± 7 years) from the French E3N-European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, 1751 women had validated type 2 diabetes during 15 years of follow-up. The total antioxidant capacity was estimated with the ferric ion-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) method. Adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to calculate HRs and 95% CIs for the associations between total antioxidant capacity and type 2 diabetes risk, adjusted for potential confounders.

RESULTS:

In multivariable models, higher levels of total antioxidant capacity were associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Compared with women in the lowest quintile, women in the third, fourth and fifth quintiles for total antioxidant capacity had HRs of 0.74 (95% CI 0.63, 0.86), 0.70 (95% CI 0.59, 0.83) and 0.73 (95% CI 0.60, 0.89), respectively. The inverse association between total antioxidant capacity and risk of type 2 diabetes was linear up to values of 15 mmol/day, after which the effect reached a plateau.

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION:

Our findings suggest that the total antioxidant capacity may play an important role in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes in middle-aged women. More studies are warranted to better understand the biological mechanisms underlying this inverse association.

KEYWORDS:

Diet; E3N cohort; FRAP (ferric ion-reducing antioxidant potential); Risk; Total antioxidant capacity; Type 2 diabetes

PMID:
29119242
DOI:
10.1007/s00125-017-4489-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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