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Nutrients. 2017 Nov 8;9(11). pii: E1227. doi: 10.3390/nu9111227.

Diet and Asthma: Is It Time to Adapt Our Message?

Author information

1
Priority Research Centre for Healthy Lungs, Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. guillel@free.fr.
2
Priority Research Centre for Healthy Lungs, Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. evan.j.williams@uon.edu.au.
3
Priority Research Centre for Healthy Lungs, Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. hayley.scott@newcastle.edu.au.
4
Priority Research Centre for Healthy Lungs, Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. bronwyn.berthon@newcastle.edu.au.
5
Priority Research Centre Grow Up Well, Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. megan.jensen@newcastle.edu.au.
6
Priority Research Centre for Healthy Lungs, Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. lisa.wood@newcastle.edu.au.
7
Priority Research Centre Grow Up Well, Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. lisa.wood@newcastle.edu.au.

Abstract

Asthma is a chronic respiratory disorder which is associated with airway inflammation. Environmental factors, in association with genetic susceptibility, play a critical role in asthma pathophysiology. Inhaled allergens, smoke exposure, indoor and outdoor air pollution are common triggers of asthma symptoms. Although the role of diet has clearly established mechanisms in diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, it is not commonly identified as a causal factor in asthma. However, some dietary patterns, such as the Western diet, which includes a high intake of refined grains, processed and red meats, and desserts, have pro-inflammatory effects. On the contrary, the Mediterranean diet, with high intake of fruits and vegetables has anti-inflammatory properties. The influence of food on asthma outcomes is of growing interest, but dietary habits of asthma patients are not commonly investigated in clinical practice. In this review, we focus on the impact of diet on asthma risk and asthma control. We also detail the influence of diet on obese patients with asthma.

KEYWORDS:

asthma; diet; inflammation; obesity

PMID:
29117118
PMCID:
PMC5707699
DOI:
10.3390/nu9111227
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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