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Am J Ind Med. 2018 Mar;61(3):239-250. doi: 10.1002/ajim.22789. Epub 2017 Nov 7.

Sinonasal cancer in the Italian national surveillance system: Epidemiology, occupation, and public health implications.

Author information

1
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Epidemiology, Hygiene, National Institute for Insurance Against Accidents at Work (INAIL), Rome, Italy.
2
Sinonasal Cancer Registry of Piedmont, Occupational Health and Safety Department, ASL CN1, Cuneo, Italy.
3
Sinonasal Cancer Registry of Lombardy, Department of Preventive Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda-Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.
4
Sinonasal Cancer Registry of Emilia-Romagna, Department of Public Health, Unit of Workplace Prevention and Safety, AUSL Imola, Italy.
5
Sinonasal Cancer Registry of Tuscany, Cancer Prevention and Research Institute (ISPO), Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology Unit, Florence, Italy.
6
Sinonasal Cancer Registry of Marche, Department of Prevention, SPreSAL, Civitanova Marche, Italy.
7
Sinonasal Cancer Registry of Lazio, Department of Epidemiology, ASL RM1, Rome, Italy.
8
Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sinonasal cancer (SNC) is a rare tumor with predominant occupational etiology associated with exposures to specific carcinogens. The aim of this study is to describe SNC cases recorded in Italy in the period 2000-2016.

METHODS:

Clinical information, occupational history, and lifestyle habits of SNC cases collected in the Italian Sinonasal Cancer Register were examined. Age-standardized rates were estimated.

RESULTS:

Overall, 1529 cases were recorded. The age-standardized incidence rates per 100 000 person-years were 0.65 in men and 0.26 in women. Occupational exposures were predominant among the attributed exposure settings, primarily to wood and leather dusts. Other putative causal agents included chrome, solvents, tannins, formaldehyde, textile dusts, and pesticides. Many cases had unknown exposure.

CONCLUSIONS:

Epidemiological surveillance of SNC cases and their occupational history is fundamental for monitoring the occurrence of the disease in exposed workers in industrial sectors generally not considered at risk of SNC as well as in non-occupational settings.

KEYWORDS:

Italy; epidemiology; exposure registry; occupational; sinonasal cancer

PMID:
29114957
DOI:
10.1002/ajim.22789

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