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Cancer Lett. 2018 Jan 28;413:122-134. doi: 10.1016/j.canlet.2017.11.002. Epub 2017 Nov 4.

Oxidative stress and dietary phytochemicals: Role in cancer chemoprevention and treatment.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Oncology, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, Comprehensive Cancer Center and National Medical Center, Duarte, CA 91010, USA.
2
Department of Molecular Medicine, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, Comprehensive Cancer Center and National Medical Center, Duarte, CA 91010, USA.
3
Department of Medical Oncology, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430, USA.
4
Department of Medical Oncology, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, Comprehensive Cancer Center and National Medical Center, Duarte, CA 91010, USA. Electronic address: ssinghal@coh.org.

Abstract

Several epidemiological observations have shown an inverse relation between consumption of plant-based foods, rich in phytochemicals, and incidence of cancer. Phytochemicals, secondary plant metabolites, via their antioxidant property play a key role in cancer chemoprevention by suppressing oxidative stress-induced DNA damage. In addition, they modulate several oxidative stress-mediated signaling pathways through their anti-oxidant effects, and ultimately protect cells from undergoing molecular changes that trigger carcinogenesis. In several instances, however, the pro-oxidant property of these phytochemicals has been observed with respect to cancer treatment. Further, in vitro and in vivo studies show that several phytochemicals potentiate the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents by exacerbating oxidative stress in cancer cells. Therefore, we reviewed multiple studies investigating the role of dietary phytochemicals such as, curcumin (turmeric), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG; green tea), resveratrol (grapes), phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), sulforaphane (cruciferous vegetables), hesperidin, quercetin and 2'-hydroxyflavanone (2HF; citrus fruits) in regulating oxidative stress and associated signaling pathways in the context of cancer chemoprevention and treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Carcinogenesis; Chemoprevention; Chemotherapy; Nrf2; Oxidative stress; Phytochemicals

PMID:
29113871
DOI:
10.1016/j.canlet.2017.11.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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