Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Dev Cell. 2017 Nov 6;43(3):290-304.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2017.10.017.

Mechanochemical Polarization of Contiguous Cell Walls Shapes Plant Pavement Cells.

Author information

1
Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC), Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
2
Centre for Image Analysis, Uppsala University, Box 337, 751 05 Uppsala, Sweden.
3
Laboratoire Reproduction et Développement des Plantes, Université de Lyon, ENS de Lyon, UCB Lyon 1, CNRS, INRA, 69342 Lyon, France.
4
Computational Biology and Biological Physics, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Sölvegatan 14A, 223 62 Lund, Sweden.
5
Department of Plant Developmental Biology, Institute of Experimental Biology, University of Wrocław, Kanonia 6/8, 50-328 Wrocław, Poland.
6
Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC), Department of Plant Physiology, Umeå University, 90187 Umeå, Sweden; Institute of Biochemistry and Biology, Plant Physiology, University of Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam, Germany.
7
Computational Biology and Biological Physics, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Sölvegatan 14A, 223 62 Lund, Sweden; Sainsbury Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Bateman Street, Cambridge CB2 1LR, UK; Department of Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA, UK.
8
Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC), Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 901 83 Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: stephanie.robert@slu.se.

Abstract

The epidermis of aerial plant organs is thought to be limiting for growth, because it acts as a continuous load-bearing layer, resisting tension. Leaf epidermis contains jigsaw puzzle piece-shaped pavement cells whose shape has been proposed to be a result of subcellular variations in expansion rate that induce local buckling events. Paradoxically, such local compressive buckling should not occur given the tensile stresses across the epidermis. Using computational modeling, we show that the simplest scenario to explain pavement cell shapes within an epidermis under tension must involve mechanical wall heterogeneities across and along the anticlinal pavement cell walls between adjacent cells. Combining genetics, atomic force microscopy, and immunolabeling, we demonstrate that contiguous cell walls indeed exhibit hybrid mechanochemical properties. Such biochemical wall heterogeneities precede wall bending. Altogether, this provides a possible mechanism for the generation of complex plant cell shapes.

KEYWORDS:

cell walls; epidermis; galactans; heterogeneity; mechanics; pavement cells; pectins; polarity

PMID:
29112850
DOI:
10.1016/j.devcel.2017.10.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center