Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Occup Environ Med. 2017 Nov;59(11):1047-1055. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001115.

Occupational Exposures and Metabolic Syndrome Among Hispanics/Latinos: Cross-Sectional Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

Author information

1
Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (Ms Bulka, Drs Persky, Argos); Institute for Minority Health Research, Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (Ms Bulka, Drs Daviglus, Durazo-Arvizu); National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (Dr Avilés-Santa); Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, California (Dr Gallo); Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York City, New York (Dr Hosgood III); Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (Dr Singer); Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Science, San Diego State University, San Diego, California (Dr Talavera); Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (Dr Thyagarajan); and Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (Dr Zeng).

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We assessed the cross-sectional relationships of self-reported current occupational exposures to solvents, metals, and pesticides with metabolic syndrome and its components among 7127 participants in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

METHODS:

Metabolic syndrome was defined as a clustering of abdominal obesity, high triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high blood pressure, and/or high fasting glucose. Regression models that incorporated inverse probability of exposure weighting were used to estimate prevalence ratios.

RESULTS:

Solvent exposure was associated with a 32% higher prevalence of high blood pressure (95% confidence interval: 1.09 to 1.60) than participants not reporting exposure. No associations were observed for occupational exposures with abdominal obesity, high triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein, or metabolic syndrome.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings suggest that solvent exposure may be an important occupational risk factor for high blood pressure among Hispanics/Latinos in the United States.

PMID:
29112602
PMCID:
PMC5841242
DOI:
10.1097/JOM.0000000000001115
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center