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Abdom Radiol (NY). 2018 Jul;43(7):1772-1784. doi: 10.1007/s00261-017-1366-2.

Diffusion-weighted imaging in hemorrhagic abdominal and pelvic lesions: restricted diffusion can mimic malignancy.

Author information

1
Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, 101 The City Dr South, Suite 0115, Orange, CA, 92868, USA.
2
Department of Radiology, Clinical Emergency Hospital, Cluj County, 3-5 Clinicilor, Cluj-Napoca, 400006, Romania. vlad.t.bura@gmail.com.
3
Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, and Urology, University of California, Irvine, 101 The City Dr. South, Orange, CA, 92868, USA.
4
Diagnostic Radiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holocombe Boulevard, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.
5
Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 222 Banpodaero, Seocho-gu, Seoul, 06591, Korea.
6
Radiology, UCSF School of Medicine, 513 Parnassus Ave, Med Sci, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA.

Abstract

Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is an increasingly utilized sequence in the assessment of abdominal and pelvic lesions. Benign lesions containing hemorrhagic products, with conglomerates of tightly packed blood cells or fibers, can have restricted water diffusion on DWI and apparent diffusion coefficient maps. Such lesions can have restricted diffusion erroneously attributed to malignancy. This review illustrates benign hemorrhagic lesions displaying restricted diffusion, with histopathologic correlation in relevant cases.

KEYWORDS:

Abdominal hemorrhagic tumors; Benign hemorrhagic lesions; Benign lesions with diffusion restriction; DWI cancer mimics; DWI of abdominal hemorrhage; Pelvic hemorrhagic tumors

PMID:
29110051
DOI:
10.1007/s00261-017-1366-2

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