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Sci Rep. 2017 Nov 6;7(1):14523. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-09388-7.

Violet Light Transmission is Related to Myopia Progression in Adult High Myopia.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-8582, Japan.
2
Laboratory of Photobiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-8582, Japan.
3
Center for Frontier Medical Engineering, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8522, Japan.
4
Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-8582, Japan. kazunonegishi@keio.jp.

Abstract

Myopia is increasing worldwide. Although the exact etiology of myopia is unknown, outdoor activity is one of the most important environmental factors for myopia control. We previously reported that violet light (VL, 360-400 nm wavelength), which is abundant in the outdoor environment, suppressed myopia progression for individuals under 20 years of age. However, whether VL is also effective for adult high myopia, which can be sight-threatening, has remained unknown. To investigate the influence of VL for adult myopia, we retrospectively compared the myopic progression and the axial length elongation over five years in adult high myopic patients over 25 years of age after two types (non-VL transmitting and VL transmitting) of phakic intraocular lens (pIOL) implantation. We found that high myopic patients with the non-VL transmitting pIOLs implanted are almost two times more myopic in the change of refraction and four times longer in the change of axial length, compared to those implanted with the VL transmitting pIOLs. This result indicated that the VL transmitting pIOL suppressed myopia progression and axial length elongation compared with the non-VL transmitting one. In conclusion, our study showed the VL possibly has an anti-myopia effect for human adults with high myopia.

PMID:
29109514
PMCID:
PMC5674003
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-09388-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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