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Chemosphere. 2018 Feb;192:282-288. doi: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.10.123. Epub 2017 Oct 24.

Fine particulate air pollution and hospital admissions and readmissions for acute myocardial infarction in 26 Chinese cities.

Author information

1
Medical Informatics Center, Peking University, No.38 Xueyuan Road, 100191, Beijing, China; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, No.38 Xueyuan Road, 100191, Beijing, China.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, No.38 Xueyuan Road, 100191, Beijing, China.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, No.38 Xueyuan Road, 100191, Beijing, China. Electronic address: yhhu@bjmu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Monitoring data on fine particulate matter (PM2.5) level in China's major cities were available since 2013. We conducted a time-stratified case-crossover study to evaluate the association between short-term exposure to PM2.5 and hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), as well as subsequent cardiac and AMI readmissions among AMI survivors. Hospital admissions for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) from 1 January 2014 through 31 December 2015 were identified from electronic Hospitalization Summary Reports. Conditional logistic regression was used to explore the relation between PM2.5 and hospital admissions for AMI. Individuals discharged alive following STEMI in 2014 were followed up for subsequent readmissions through 31 December 2015. We used the Cox proportional hazards model to evaluate the effect of PM2.5 pollution on subsequent cardiac and STEMI readmissions. Hospital admissions for STEMI (n = 106,467) and NSTEMI (n = 12,719) were examined separately. Exposure to an interquartile range (IQR) increase in PM2.5 concentration (47.5 μg/m3) at lags 2, 3, 4 and 0-5 days corresponded with 0.6% (95% CI, 0.1%-1.1%), 0.8 (95% CI, 0.3%-1.3%), 0.6% (95% CI, 0.1%-1.1%) and 0.9% (95% CI, 0-1.8%) increases in STEMI admissions, respectively. For NSTEMI, no significant association was observed with PM2.5. We also observed significant associations of PM2.5 concentration with both subsequent cardiac and STEMI readmissions among STEMI survivors. In conclusion, short-term elevations in PM2.5 concentration may increase the risk of STEMI but not NSTEMI, and the association appeared to be more evident among STEMI survivors.

KEYWORDS:

Acute myocardial infarction; China; Hospitalization; PM(2.5); Readmission

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