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J Sci Med Sport. 2018 Jan;21(1):75-83. doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2017.10.006. Epub 2017 Oct 18.

Is inertial flywheel resistance training superior to gravity-dependent resistance training in improving muscle strength? A systematic review with meta-analyses.

Author information

1
Sportclínic, Physiotherapy and Sports Training Centre, Spain; School of Health and Sport Sciences (EUSES), Universitat de Girona, Spain. Electronic address: jordi.vicensb@cadscrits.udg.edu.
2
Sportclínic, Physiotherapy and Sports Training Centre, Spain; School of Health and Sport Sciences (EUSES), Universitat de Girona, Spain.
3
Blanquerna Faculty of Psychology, Education Sciences and Sport (FPCEE), Universitat Ramon Llull, Spain; School of Health and Sport Sciences (EUSES), Universitat de Girona, Spain.
4
Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Research - Copenhagen (PMR-C), Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Clinical Research Center, Amager-Hvidovre Hospital, Copenhagen University, Denmark.
5
Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Research - Copenhagen (PMR-C), Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Clinical Research Center, Amager-Hvidovre Hospital, Copenhagen University, Denmark; Sports Orthopedic Research Center - Copenhagen (SORC-C), Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Amager-Hvidovre Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The primary aim of this systematic review was to determine if inertial flywheel resistance training is superior to gravity-dependent resistance training in improving muscle strength. The secondary aim was to determine whether inertial flywheel resistance training is superior to gravity-dependent resistance training in improving other muscular adaptations.

DESIGN:

A systematic review with meta-analyses of randomised and non-randomised controlled trials.

METHODS:

We searched MEDLINE, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials with no publication date restrictions until November 2016. We performed meta-analyses on randomised and non-randomised controlled trials to determine the standardized mean difference between the effects of inertial flywheel and gravity-dependent resistance training on muscle strength. A total of 76 and 71 participants were included in the primary and secondary analyses, respectively.

RESULTS:

After systematic review, we included three randomised and four non-randomised controlled trials. In the primary analysis for the primary outcome muscle strength, the pooled results from randomised controlled trials showed no difference (SMD=-0.05; 95%CI -0.51 to 0.40; p=0.82; I2=0%). In the secondary analyses of the primary outcome, the pooled results from non-randomised controlled trials showed no difference (SMD=0.02; 95%CI -0.45 to 0.49; p=0.93; I2=0%; and SMD=0.03; 95%CI -0.43 to 0.50; p=0.88; I2=0%). Meta-analysis on secondary outcomes could not be performed.

CONCLUSION:

Based on the available data, inertial flywheel resistance training was not superior to gravity-dependent resistance training in enhancing muscle strength. Data for other strength variables and other muscular adaptations was insufficient to draw firm conclusions from.

KEYWORDS:

Eccentric overload; Humans; Hypertrophy; Muscle strength; Muscular adaptations; Physiology

PMID:
29107539
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsams.2017.10.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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