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Neuron. 2017 Nov 15;96(4):871-882.e5. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2017.09.052. Epub 2017 Nov 5.

Deprivation-Induced Homeostatic Spine Scaling In Vivo Is Localized to Dendritic Branches that Have Undergone Recent Spine Loss.

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience, Physiology, and Pharmacology, University College London, 21 University Street, London WC1E 6DE, UK; MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology, King's College London, New Hunt's House 4th Floor, London SE1 1UL, UK.
2
Department of Neuroscience, Physiology, and Pharmacology, University College London, 21 University Street, London WC1E 6DE, UK.
3
Medical Gene Technology Unit, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1450 Budapest, Hungary.
4
Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, Bessemer Building 4th Floor, London SW7 2AZ, UK.
5
Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, Maulbeerstrasse 66, Basel 4058, Switzerland.
6
Department of Neuroscience, Physiology, and Pharmacology, University College London, 21 University Street, London WC1E 6DE, UK; MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology, King's College London, New Hunt's House 4th Floor, London SE1 1UL, UK. Electronic address: t.keck@ucl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Synaptic scaling is a key homeostatic plasticity mechanism and is thought to be involved in the regulation of cortical activity levels. Here we investigated the spatial scale of homeostatic changes in spine size following sensory deprivation in a subset of inhibitory (layer 2/3 GAD65-positive) and excitatory (layer 5 Thy1-positive) neurons in mouse visual cortex. Using repeated in vivo two-photon imaging, we find that increases in spine size are tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) dependent and thus are likely associated with synaptic scaling. Rather than occurring at all spines, the observed increases in spine size are spatially localized to a subset of dendritic branches and are correlated with the degree of recent local spine loss within that branch. Using simulations, we show that such a compartmentalized form of synaptic scaling has computational benefits over cell-wide scaling for information processing within the cell.

PMID:
29107520
PMCID:
PMC5697914
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2017.09.052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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