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J Nutr Educ Behav. 2018 Feb;50(2):190-197.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2017.09.009. Epub 2017 Nov 6.

Breakfast Quality Varies by Location among Low-Income Ethnically Diverse Children in Public Urban Schools.

Author information

1
Center for Obesity Research and Education, College of Public Health, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA.
2
Department of Behavioral Health and Nutrition, College of Health Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE.
3
Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
4
Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Weight Watchers International, New York, NY.
5
The Food Trust, Philadelphia, PA.
6
Center for Obesity Research and Education, College of Public Health, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA; Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health, Philadelphia, PA. Electronic address: jofisher@temple.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate breakfast location and children's food choices.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional analysis of 1,371 fourth- through sixth-grade students in 2013. Foods and beverages in 17 categories characterized breakfast choices: (1) ≥ 1 fruits or vegetables, (2) ≥ 1 foods high in saturated fats and added sugars (SFAS), and (3) meeting School Breakfast Program (SBP) requirements.

RESULTS:

Among breakfast eaters (n = 1,133; 82.6%), 46.0% ate at home, 13.1% ate at school, 41.0% ate at multiple locations; and 21.8% ate at a corner store. Those eating at school were more likely to consume ≥1 fruit or vegetable (odds ratio [OR] = 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26-2.87), less likely to eat ≥1 SFAS food (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.22-0.94), and more likely to meet SBP requirements (OR = 2.47; 95% CI, 1.42-4.29). Those eating at corner stores (n = 247) were more likely to consume high-SFAS foods (63.9% vs 9.2%; P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS:

Eating school breakfast increased the odds of consuming fruit, choosing lower SFAS, and meeting nutritional requirements of the SBP relative to other locations.

KEYWORDS:

breakfast; children; corner stores; eating patterns; school meals

PMID:
29107474
DOI:
10.1016/j.jneb.2017.09.009

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