Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Hosp Infect. 2018 Feb;98(2):141-148. doi: 10.1016/j.jhin.2017.10.016. Epub 2017 Oct 26.

Randomized controlled trial of honey versus mupirocin to decolonize patients with nasal colonization of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

Author information

1
Infection Prevention and Control Department, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Education and Research Centre, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Electronic address: toneythomas@beaumont.ie.
2
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Áras Moyola, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
3
Department of Pharmacy, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
4
Microbiology Department, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
5
School of Public Health, Physiotherapy and Sports Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
6
Infection Prevention and Control Department, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Education and Research Centre, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Mupirocin is used specifically for the eradication of nasal meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), but increasing mupirocin resistance restricts its repeated use. The antibacterial effects of manuka honey have been established in vitro; antibacterial activity of other honeys has also been reported.

AIM:

To describe the learning experience from a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing the efficacy of medical-grade honey (MGH) with mupirocin 2% for the eradication of nasal MRSA.

METHODS:

Patients colonized in the nose with MRSA and age ≥18 years were recruited. Participants received either one or two courses of MGH or mupirocin 2%, three times per day for five consecutive days.

FINDINGS:

The proportion of patients who were decolonized after one or two courses of treatment was not significantly different between MGH [18/42; 42.8%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 27.7-59.0] and mupirocin 2% (25/44; 56.8%; 95% CI: 41.0-71.7). Non-nasal MRSA colonization was significantly associated with persistent nasal colonization (odds ratio: 5.186; 95% CI: 1.736-5.489; P = 0.003). The rate of new acquisition of mupirocin resistance was 9.75%.

CONCLUSION:

Although not significant, a decolonization rate of 42.8% for MGH was impressive. Our findings suggest that this strategy, which has the potential to combat antimicrobial resistance, should be assessed in similar but larger studies.

KEYWORDS:

Antimicrobial resistance; Decolonization; Medical-grade honey; Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

PMID:
29107078
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhin.2017.10.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center