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Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2017 Nov;102:61-66. doi: 10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.08.035. Epub 2017 Sep 4.

Role of imaging in the diagnosis of parotid infantile hemangiomas.

Author information

1
Vascular Anomalies Center, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
2
Vascular Anomalies Center, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Plastic and Oral Surgery, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Vascular Anomalies Center, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Vascular Anomalies Center, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Dermatology, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Radiology, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
6
Vascular Anomalies Center, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: gulraiz.chaudry@childrens.harvard.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To review the clinical presentation, imaging and follow-up of parotid infantile hemangiomas (IH).

METHODS:

Over a 15-year period, all patients with a clinical diagnosis of parotid IH were evaluated. Imaging was available in 35. The medical records, photographs, and radiology studies of these patients were reviewed.

RESULTS:

All patients presented at less than 4 months of age (M:F, 13:21). 19 (55)% of tumors were on the left and were bilateral in 2 patients. The majority (29 patients) presented due to localized swelling or palpable mass; the remainder had a cutaneous lesion, but no palpable mass at the time of presentation. The referring diagnosis was incomplete or incorrect in 9 patients (26%). The imaging studies all demonstrated a well-defined homogeneous mass, with no abnormality of the surrounding subcutaneous fat. Sonography showed a uniformly vascular lesion with pulsatile fast-flow seen on Doppler. On MRI, the lesion was hyperintense on T2-weighted images, isointense on T1, with intense enhancement post-contrast. Oral therapy (propranolol or corticosteroids) was prescribed in 15 (45%). Follow-up in 28 patients demonstrated stability of the lesion in 11, regression in size in 11 and complete involution in 6. After involution 2 patients underwent resection of residual tissue and/or excess skin.

CONCLUSIONS:

Typical clinical presentation alone may be adequate to establish a diagnosis of parotid infantile hemangioma. However, in patients with no overlying cutaneous lesion, imaging can play a critical role in confirming the diagnosis. The sonographic findings are sufficiently characteristic to allow for a definitive diagnosis, obviating the need for further investigations. If diagnostic uncertainty remains or the full extent of the lesion cannot be appreciated, then MRI should be preferred over CT to avoid ionizing radiation.

KEYWORDS:

Hemangioma; Imaging; Parotid

PMID:
29106877
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.08.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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