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J Infect Dis. 2017 Dec 27;217(1):93-102. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jix565.

Vaccination With a Latch Peptide Provides Serotype-Independent Protection Against Group B Streptococcus Infection in Mice.

Lin SM1,2, Jang AY1,3, Zhi Y1,4, Gao S1,2, Lim S1,4, Lim JH4, Song JY5, Sullam PM6,7,8,9, Rhee JH2,10,11, Seo HS1,4.

Author information

1
Biotechnology Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup.
2
Brain Korea 21 Program for Leading Universities and Students, Department of Molecular Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju.
3
Department of Biological Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju.
4
Department of Radiation Biotechnology and Applied Radioisotope Science, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
6
Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
7
Division of Infectious Diseases, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
8
Department of Medicine, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
9
Northern California Institute for Research and Education, San Francisco, California.
10
Department of Microbiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju.
11
Clinical Vaccine Research and Development Center, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju.

Abstract

Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) is a leading cause of invasive diseases in neonates and severe infections in elderly individuals. GBS serine-rich repeat glycoprotein 1 (Srr1) acts as a critical virulence factor by facilitating GBS invasion into the central nervous system through interaction with the fibrinogen Aα chain. This study revealed that srr1 is highly conserved, with 86.7% of GBS clinical isolates expressing the protein. Vaccination of mice with different Srr1 truncated peptides revealed that only Srr1 truncates containing the latch domain protected against GBS meningitis. Furthermore, the latch peptide alone was immunogenic and elicited protective antibodies, which efficiently enhanced antibody-mediated opsonophagocytic killing of GBS by HL60 cells and provided heterogeneous protection against 4 different GBS serogroups. Taken together, these findings indicated that the latch domain of Srr1 may constitute an effective peptide vaccine candidate for GBS.

KEYWORDS:

Streptococcus agalactiae; latch; serine-rich repeat; vaccine

PMID:
29106586
PMCID:
PMC5854025
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jix565
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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