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Cardiovasc Res. 2018 Jan 1;114(1):19-34. doi: 10.1093/cvr/cvx211.

Extracellular vesicles in diagnostics and therapy of the ischaemic heart: Position Paper from the Working Group on Cellular Biology of the Heart of the European Society of Cardiology.

Author information

1
Experimental Cardiology Laboratory, UMC Utrecht Regenerative Medicine Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, University Utrecht, 3508GA Utrecht, The Netherlands.
2
The Hatter Cardiovascular Institute, University College London, London, UK.
3
INSERM UMR-S 970, Paris Cardiovascular Research Center-PARCC, Paris, France.
4
Department of Genetics, Cell- and Immunobiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
5
MTA-SE Immunoproteogenomics Research Group, Budapest, Hungary.
6
Department of Vascular Surgery, UMC Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
7
Netherlands Heart Institute, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
8
Experimental Renal and Cardiovascular Research, Department of Nephropathology, Institute of Pathology, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany.
9
Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
10
Cardiovascular & Metabolic Disorders Program, Duke-National University of Singapore Medical School, 8 College Road, Singapore 169857.
11
National Heart Research Institute Singapore, National Heart Centre Singapore, 5 Hospital Drive, Singapore 169609.
12
Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Singapore, 1E Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119228.
13
The Hatter Cardiovascular Institute, University College London, 67 Chenies Mews, London WC1E 6HX, UK.
14
The National Institute of Health Research University College London Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre, Research & Development, Maple House 1st floor, 149 Tottenham Court Road, London W1T 7DN, UK.
15
Department of Cardiology, Barts Heart Centre, St Bartholomew's Hospital, W Smithfield, London EC1A 7BE, UK.
16
Department of Pharmacology, Center for Translational Medicine, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
17
Hatter Institute for Cardiovascular Research in Africa and Lionel Opie Preclinical Imaging Core Facility, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa.
18
Neufeld Cardiac Research Institute, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Hashomer, Israel; Tamman Cardiovascular Research Institute, Heart Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.
19
Center of Aging Science and Regenerative Medicine, CESI-Met and Institute of Cardiology, "G. D'Annunzio" University, Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy.
20
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Medical School in Houston, TX, USA.
21
Texas Heart Institute, Houston, TX, USA.
22
Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
23
Institut Mitovasc, CHU d'Angers, Université d'Angers, Angers, France.
24
Cardiovascular Research Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
25
Laboratory Clinical Chemistry and Hematology Division, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
26
Institute of Physiology, Justus-Liebig University of Giessen, Aulweg 129, 35392, Giessen, Germany.
27
Division Heart and Lungs, and Hubrecht Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
28
Cardiovascular Research Group, Department of Medical Biology, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
29
Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, Semmelweis University, Nagyvárad tér 4, Budapest 1089, Hungary and.
30
Pharmahungary Group, Szeged, Hungary.

Abstract

Extracellular vesicles (EVs)-particularly exosomes and microvesicles (MVs)-are attracting considerable interest in the cardiovascular field as the wide range of their functions is recognized. These capabilities include transporting regulatory molecules including different RNA species, lipids, and proteins through the extracellular space including blood and delivering these cargos to recipient cells to modify cellular activity. EVs powerfully stimulate angiogenesis, and can protect the heart against myocardial infarction. They also appear to mediate some of the paracrine effects of cells, and have therefore been proposed as a potential alternative to cell-based regenerative therapies. Moreover, EVs of different sources may be useful biomarkers of cardiovascular disease identities. However, the methods used for the detection and isolation of EVs have several limitations and vary widely between studies, leading to uncertainties regarding the exact population of EVs studied and how to interpret the data. The number of publications in the exosome and MV field has been increasing exponentially in recent years and, therefore, in this ESC Working Group Position Paper, the overall objective is to provide a set of recommendations for the analysis and translational application of EVs focussing on the diagnosis and therapy of the ischaemic heart. This should help to ensure that the data from emerging studies are robust and repeatable, and optimize the pathway towards the diagnostic and therapeutic use of EVs in clinical studies for patient benefit.

KEYWORDS:

Cardioprotection; Co-morbidities; Exosomes; Extracellular vesicles; Heart failure; Ischaemia; Microvesicles; Postconditioning; Preconditioning; Regenerative medicine; Remote conditioning; Reperfusion

PMID:
29106545
PMCID:
PMC5852624
DOI:
10.1093/cvr/cvx211
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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