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Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2018 Mar;103(3):390-394. doi: 10.1002/cpt.890. Epub 2017 Nov 6.

Research Directions in Genetic Predispositions to Stevens-Johnson Syndrome / Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.

Author information

1
Division of Genomic Medicine, National Human Genome Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
2
Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA.
3
Division of Skin and Rheumatic Diseases, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
4
Center for Biomedical Informatics, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
5
Departments of Biomedical Informatics and Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
6
Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Transplantation, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
7
Cancer and Inflammation Program, Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA and Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
8
Medical Genomic Center, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.
9
Department of Dermatology, Drug Hypersensitivity Clinical and Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospitals, Taipei, Linkou, and Keelung, and College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
10
Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Foundation, Westminster, Colorado, USA.
11
Institute and Department of Pharmacology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.
12
Genomic Medicine Institute, Geisinger Health System, Danville, Pennsylvania, USA.
13
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutic Innovation, Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri, USA.
14
Clinical Pharmacology Program, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
15
Medical Genetics Center, Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand.
16
DeBartolo Family Personalized Medicine Institute, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida, USA.
17
Dokumentationszentrum schwerer Hautreaktionen (dZh), Department of Dermatology, Medical Center and Medical Faculty - University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
18
Department of Medicine, Pharmacology, Oates Institute for Experimental Therapeutics, Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
19
Institute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Australia.
20
Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.
21
Duke-National University of Singapore Medical School, Singapore.
22
Health Product Vigilance Center, Thai Food and Drug Administration, Nonthaburi, Thailand.
23
School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.
24
Office of the Director, National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
25
Department of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
26
YARSI Research Institute, YARSI University, Jakarta, Indonesia.
27
Department of Medicine (Dermatology and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology), University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

Abstract

Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) is one of the most devastating of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and was, until recently, essentially unpredictable. With the discovery of several risk alleles for drug-induced SJS/TEN and the demonstration of effectiveness of screening in reducing incidence, the stage is set for implementation of preventive strategies in populations at risk. Yet much remains to be learned about this potentially fatal complication of commonly used drugs.

PMID:
29105735
PMCID:
PMC5805563
DOI:
10.1002/cpt.890
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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