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In Vivo. 2017 Nov-Dec;31(6):1047-1050.

Ghrelin and Obesity: Identifying Gaps and Dispelling Myths. A Reappraisal.

Author information

1
First Surgical Department, G. Gennimatas General Hospital of Athens, Athens, Greece.
2
Alpha Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Marousi, Athens, Greece.
3
First Department of Surgery, Laikon General Hospital, Athens, Greece.
4
Department of General Surgery, St Marien Hospital, Buer, Germany.
5
Department of Colorectal Surgery, St. Mark's Hospital, London, U.K.
6
Division of Metabolic and Weight Loss Surgery, Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, NC, U.S.A.
7
Division of Metabolic and Weight Loss Surgery, Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, NC, U.S.A. dimmoris@yahoo.com.

Abstract

The etiology of obesity is complex. Environmental and genetic causes have been implicated in the development of this disease. Ghrelin is a hormone known to stimulate appetite. There are numerous possible actions through which ghrelin exerts its effect in the body: a) Overproduction of ghrelin, b) reduced ghrelin following meals, and c) increased receptor sensitivity to ghrelin action. Sleeve gastrectomy, a bariatric procedure, leads to reduction of ghrelin levels and subsequently to weight loss. However, there are many limitations to measurement of the fasting plasma level of the active form of ghrelin. The establishment of the exact correlation between ghrelin, appetite and obesity could be vital for the fight against obesity.

KEYWORDS:

Ghrelin; appetite; bariatric surgery; diet; hormone levels; obesity; review

PMID:
29102924
PMCID:
PMC5756630
DOI:
10.21873/invivo.11168
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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