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Soc Sci Med. 2017 Dec;195:12-16. doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.10.027. Epub 2017 Nov 3.

Gene-environment interactions between education and body mass: Evidence from the UK and Finland.

Author information

1
Department of Economics, Central Michigan University, United States. Electronic address: amin1v@cmich.edu.
2
Turku School of Economics, Labour Institute for Economic Research, Helsinki, Finland; IZA, Germany. Electronic address: petri.bockerman@labour.fi.
3
Jyväskylä University School of Business and Economics, Jyväskylä, Finland. Electronic address: jutta.viinikainen@jyu.fi.
4
Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, United Kingdom. Electronic address: mcsmar@essex.ac.uk.
5
Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, United Kingdom. Electronic address: ybaoa@essex.ac.uk.
6
Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, United Kingdom. Electronic address: mkumari@essex.ac.uk.
7
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Finland. Electronic address: niina.siitonen@utu.fi.
8
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Fimlab Laboratories and Finnish Cardiovascular Research Center Tampere, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland. Electronic address: terho.lehtimaki@uta.fi.
9
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku and Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. Electronic address: olli.raitakari@utu.fi.
10
Jyväskylä University School of Business and Economics, Jyväskylä, Finland. Electronic address: jaakko.k.pehkonen@jyu.fi.

Abstract

More education is associated with a lower body mass index (BMI) and likelihood of being overweight. However, since a large proportion of the variation in body mass is due to genetic makeup, it has been hypothesized that education may moderate the genetic risk. We estimate main associations between (i) education, (ii) genetic risk, and (iii) interactions between education and genetic risk on BMI and the probability of being overweight in the UK and Finland. The estimates show that education is negatively associated with BMI and overweightness, and genetic risk is positively associated. However, the interactions between education and genetic risk are small and statistically insignificant.

KEYWORDS:

Education; Gene-environment interactions; Obesity

PMID:
29102742
DOI:
10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.10.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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