Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cancer Epidemiol. 2017 Dec;51:98-108. doi: 10.1016/j.canep.2017.10.013. Epub 2017 Nov 5.

Smoking cessation and subsequent risk of cancer: A pooled analysis of eight population-based cohort studies in Japan.

Author information

1
Department of Global Health Policy, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: mnminoue@ncc.go.jp.
3
Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan.
4
Division of Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan.
5
Division of Molecular Medicine, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan.
6
Department of Preventive Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.
7
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu, Japan.
8
Department of Public Health, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.
9
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Forensic Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan.
10
Department of Epidemiology and International Health, International Clinical Research Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
11
Department of Preventive Medicine, Saga Medical School, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although East Asia is one of the largest tobacco-epidemic regions in the world, only a few prospective studies from Asia have investigated the impact of smoking and cessation of smoking on cancer. We aimed to assess the effect of cessation of smoking on the risk of cancer using eight population-based cohort studies in Japan.

METHODS:

We analyzed pooled data from eight population-based prospective cohort studies in Japan with more than 320,000 participants to assess the effect of smoking cessation on the risk of total cancers and smoking-related cancers.

RESULTS:

After adjustment for potential confounders, cancer risks in men with >21years of smoking cessation before baseline were found to decrease to the same level as never smokers for total cancer (never smokers: reference; former smokers with ≥21 years since smoking cessation: HR, 1.01; 95%CI: 0.91, 1.11). Even men who are heavy smokers (more than 20 pack-years) reported a reduced risk of total cancer (never smokers: reference; former smokers with ≥21 years since smoking cessation: HR, 1.06; 95%CI: 0.92, 1.23). In women, the risk of total cancer did not differ from that of never smokers after 11 years of smoking cessation before baseline (never smokers: reference; former smokers with ≥11 years since smoking cessation: HR, 0.96; 95%CI: 0.74, 1.23).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study suggests that longer duration of smoking cessation may attenuate the risk of cancer in both men and women, and that even heavy smokers (more than 20 pack-years) were found to benefit from quitting smoking.

KEYWORDS:

Cohort study; Japanese; Pooled analysis; Smoking cessation; Tobacco-related cancer

PMID:
29102692
DOI:
10.1016/j.canep.2017.10.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center