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J Am Coll Radiol. 2018 Feb;15(2):258-261. doi: 10.1016/j.jacr.2017.09.030. Epub 2017 Nov 1.

Citation Impact of Collaboration in Radiology Research.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, NYU School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York. Electronic address: andrew.rosenkrantz@nyumc.org.
2
Department of Radiology, NYU School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York.
3
Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Team science involving multidisciplinary and multi-institutional collaboration is increasingly recognized as a means of strengthening the quality of scientific research. The aim of this study was to assess associations between various forms of collaboration and the citation impact of published radiology research.

METHODS:

In 2010, 876 original research articles published in Academic Radiology, the American Journal of Roentgenology, JACR, and Radiology were identified with at least one radiology-affiliated author. All articles were manually reviewed to extract features related to all authors' disciplines and institutions. Citations to these articles through September 2016 were extracted from Thomson Reuters Web of Science.

RESULTS:

Subsequent journal article citation counts were significantly higher (P < .05) for original research articles with at least seven versus six or fewer authors (26.2 ± 30.8 versus 20.3 ± 23.1, respectively), with authors from multiple countries versus from a single country (32.3 ± 39.2 versus 22.0 ± 25.0, respectively), with rather than without a nonuniversity collaborator (28.7 ± 38.6 versus 22.4 ± 24.9, respectively), and with rather than without a nonclinical collaborator (26.5 ± 33.1 versus 21.9 ± 24.4, respectively). On multivariate regression analysis, the strongest independent predictors of the number of citations were authors from multiple countries (β = 9.14, P = .002), a nonuniversity collaborator (β = 4.80, P = .082), and at least seven authors (β = 4.11, P = .038).

CONCLUSIONS:

With respect to subsequent journal article citations, various forms of collaboration are associated with greater scholarly impact of published radiology research. To enhance the relevance of their research, radiology investigators are encouraged to pursue collaboration across traditional disciplinary, institutional, and geographic boundaries.

KEYWORDS:

Biomedical research; bibliometrics; citation count; collaboration

PMID:
29100883
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacr.2017.09.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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