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Nicotine Tob Res. 2017 Nov 1. doi: 10.1093/ntr/ntx238. [Epub ahead of print]

Examining the association between physical activity, sedentary behaviour and sport participation with e-cigarette use and smoking status in a large sample of Canadian Youth.

Author information

1
School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, School of Public Health and Health Systems University of Waterloo 200 University Avenue Waterloo ON Canada N2L 3G1.
2
Department of Economics, University of Waterloo, Department of Economics University of Waterloo 200 University Avenue Waterloo ON Canada N2L 3G1.
3
Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA), McMaster University, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis CRL Building, 282 McMaster University 1280 Main Street West Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4K1.
4
Department of Economics, McMaster University Department of Economics Kenneth Taylor Hall, Room 426 McMaster University 1280 Main Street West Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4M4.

Abstract

Introduction:

Youth e-cigarette use is common worldwide, but the profile of e-cigarette users compared with tobacco users is unclear. This study examines how sport participation and activity levels among youth differ between e-cigarette users and smokers.

Methods:

Using Canadian data from 38,977 grade 9 to 12 students who participated in Year 3 (2014-15) of the COMPASS study, logistic regression models were used to examine the likelihood of sport participation and activity level based on e-cigarette use and smoking status. Pearson's chi-square tests were used to examine subgroup differences by gender.

Results:

E-cigarette users are more likely to participate in intramural, competitive, and team sports compared to non-users. Current and former smokers are less likely to participate in those sports than non-smokers. Youth e-cigarette users are more likely than non-users to meet the physical activity guidelines. Current smokers are more likely than non-smokers to undertake physical activity at least 60 minutes daily but less likely than non-smokers to tone at least 3 times per week. Youth e-cigarette users are less likely than non-users to be sedentary less than 2 hours daily. Gender differences among males and females show that male e-cigarettes users drive the general relationship.

Conclusion:

Results suggest that e-cigarette users are more likely to engage in physical activity compared to non e-cigarette users. Youth e-cigarette users are more likely to be physically active while the opposite is true for smokers. Although e-cigarettes may be less harmful to health compared to cigarette smoking, the increased uptake among youth of differing profiles should be considered in prevention efforts.

Implications:

These results highlight the importance of addressing e-cigarette use in youth who undertake health promoting behaviours. Prevention efforts should not focus only on youth who may undertake riskier health habits; e-cigarette prevention programs should go beyond the domain of tobacco control.

PMID:
29099946
DOI:
10.1093/ntr/ntx238

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