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World J Gastroenterol. 2017 Oct 14;23(38):6931-6941. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v23.i38.6931.

How to perform gastrointestinal ultrasound: Anatomy and normal findings.

Author information

1
Translational Gastroenterology Unit, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford OX3 9DU, United Kingdom.
2
School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, 5005, Australia.
3
Department of Ultrasound, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China.
4
Ambulanzzentrum Gastroenterologie, Klinikum Lüneburg, 21339 Lüneburg, Germany.
5
Department of Gastroenterology, Städtisches Klinikum Luneburg gGmbH, 21339 Lüneburg, Germany.
6
Gastrointestinal Unit, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, "L.Sacco" University Hospital, 20157 Milan, Italy.
7
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Vic, Australia; Monash University, Melbourne 3004 Vic, Australia.
8
Piedmont Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30076, United States.
9
Fremantle Hospital and Health Service, Emergency Department, Fremantle, WA 6160, United States.
10
National Centre for Ultrasound in Gastroenterology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen N-5021, Norway.
11
Department of Gastroenterology, Brandenburg Medical School, 16816 Neuruppin, Germany.
12
Med. Klinik 2, Caritas-Krankenhaus Bad Mergentheim, D-97980 Bad Mergentheim, Germany.
13
Med. Klinik 2, Caritas-Krankenhaus Bad Mergentheim, D-97980 Bad Mergentheim, Germany. christoph.dietrich@ckbm.de.

Abstract

Gastrointestinal ultrasound is a practical, safe, cheap and reproducible diagnostic tool in inflammatory bowel disease gaining global prominence amongst clinicians. Understanding the embryological processes of the intestinal tract assists in the interpretation of abnormal sonographic findings. In general terms, the examination principally comprises interrogation of the colon, mesentery and small intestine using both low-frequency and high-frequency probes. Interpretation of findings on GIUS includes assessment of bowel wall thickness, symmetry of this thickness, evidence of transmural changes, assessment of vascularity using Doppler imaging and assessment of other specific features including lymph nodes, mesentery and luminal motility. In addition to B-mode imaging, transperineal ultrasonography, elastography and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography are useful adjuncts. This supplement expands upon these features in more depth.

KEYWORDS:

Guidelines; Inflammatory bowel disease; Intestinal; Teaching; Ultrasound

PMID:
29097866
PMCID:
PMC5658311
DOI:
10.3748/wjg.v23.i38.6931
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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