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Neuron. 2017 Nov 1;96(3):542-557. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2017.10.007.

The BRAIN Initiative Cell Census Consortium: Lessons Learned toward Generating a Comprehensive Brain Cell Atlas.

Author information

1
Genomic Analysis Laboratory and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
2
Program in Neurogenetics, Departments of Neurology and Human Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
3
Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
4
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, QB3 Functional Genomics Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. Electronic address: jngai@berkeley.edu.
5
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA.
6
Klarman Cell Observatory, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Department of Biology, Koch Institute of Integrative Cancer Research, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.
7
Departments of Neuroscience, Genetics, Psychiatry and Comparative Medicine, Program in Cellular Neuroscience, Neurodegeneration and Repair, Yale Child Study Center, Kavli Institute for Neuroscience, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA.
8
McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
9
Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle, WA 98109, USA.

Abstract

A comprehensive characterization of neuronal cell types, their distributions, and patterns of connectivity is critical for understanding the properties of neural circuits and how they generate behaviors. Here we review the experiences of the BRAIN Initiative Cell Census Consortium, ten pilot projects funded by the U.S. BRAIN Initiative, in developing, validating, and scaling up emerging genomic and anatomical mapping technologies for creating a complete inventory of neuronal cell types and their connections in multiple species and during development. These projects lay the foundation for a larger and longer-term effort to generate whole-brain cell atlases in species including mice and humans.

KEYWORDS:

BRAIN initiative; anatomy; cell census; connectivity; electrophysiology; human brain; mouse brain; single-cell RNA-seq; single-cell epigenomics; single-cell transcriptomics

PMID:
29096072
PMCID:
PMC5689454
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2017.10.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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