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PLoS One. 2017 Nov 2;12(11):e0187405. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0187405. eCollection 2017.

Journey to the east: Diverse routes and variable flowering times for wheat and barley en route to prehistoric China.

Author information

1
Department of Anthropology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States of America.
2
McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
3
Institutue of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing, China.
4
Institute for the History of Natural Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
5
Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of Art, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
6
Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre (SUERC), University of Glasgow, East Kibride, United Kingdom.
7
Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany, Lucknow, India.
8
Department of AIHC and Archaeology, Banaras Hindu University, Varnasi, India.
9
Department of Anthropology, Washington State University, Vancouver, WA, United States of America.
10
Department of Archaeology, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania.
11
Key Laboratory of Western China's Environmental Systems, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China.
12
Department of Archaeology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
13
Department of History of Science and Archaeometry, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
14
School of Cultural Heritage, Northwest University, Xi'an, China.
15
School of History and Culture, Shandong University, Jinan, China.
16
Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, Peking University, Beijing, China.
17
School of Archaeology and Museology, Peking University, Beijing, China.

Abstract

Today, farmers in many regions of eastern Asia sow their barley grains in the spring and harvest them in the autumn of the same year (spring barley). However, when it was first domesticated in southwest Asia, barley was grown between the autumn and subsequent spring (winter barley), to complete their life cycles before the summer drought. The question of when the eastern barley shifted from the original winter habit to flexible growing schedules is of significance in terms of understanding its spread. This article investigates when barley cultivation dispersed from southwest Asia to regions of eastern Asia and how the eastern spring barley evolved in this context. We report 70 new radiocarbon measurements obtained directly from barley grains recovered from archaeological sites in eastern Eurasia. Our results indicate that the eastern dispersals of wheat and barley were distinct in both space and time. We infer that barley had been cultivated in a range of markedly contrasting environments by the second millennium BC. In this context, we consider the distribution of known haplotypes of a flowering-time gene in barley, Ppd-H1, and infer that the distributions of those haplotypes may reflect the early dispersal of barley. These patterns of dispersal resonate with the second and first millennia BC textual records documenting sowing and harvesting times for barley in central/eastern China.

PMID:
29095896
PMCID:
PMC5667820
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0187405
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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