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Pediatr Emerg Care. 2017 Nov;33(11):e118-e121. doi: 10.1097/PEC.0000000000001291.

Short-Term Propofol Infusion and Associated Effects on Serum Lactate in Pediatric Patients.

Author information

1
From the *Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI; and †Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, University Hospitals, Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study aimed to determine if short-duration procedural sedation in children with propofol is related to an adverse metabolic stress response measured by serum lactate. Propofol infusion syndrome is associated with high-dose and long-duration infusion. It has not been studied with short-duration, outpatient propofol administration.

METHODS:

This was a prospective, longitudinal study that included 50 patients between the ages of 2 and 18 years who were undergoing outpatient procedural sedation with propofol at a pediatric sedation unit. Patients received bolus or bolus and continuous infusion doses of propofol. Serum lactate values were obtained before and after the patients' sedated procedures.

RESULTS:

The average length of procedure was 40.3 minutes, and the mean dose of propofol per patient was 8.2 mg/kg. The highest measured lactate value was 1.8 mmol/L. The average (SD) preprocedure and postprocedure lactate values were 1.0 (0.3) and 0.7 (0.2) mmol/L, respectively, resulting in an overall significant decrease in lactate of -0.3 (0.3) mmol/L (P < 0.001). There was a significant (P = 0.01) positive relationship between age and postprocedure lactate value, when controlling for the length of the procedure in a multivariable regression. No significant association was found between propofol dosage and length of the procedure with lactate values.

CONCLUSION:

In this study, we did not find a significant increase in metabolic stress, measured by serum lactate. Using propofol for short-duration procedural sedation may not carry similar risks for propofol infusion syndrome to those for long-duration/high-dose infusion therapy.

PMID:
29095778
DOI:
10.1097/PEC.0000000000001291
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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