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J Emerg Med. 2018 Feb;54(2):215-220. doi: 10.1016/j.jemermed.2017.09.020. Epub 2017 Oct 28.

Ultrasound for the Diagnosis and Management of Suspected Urolithiasis in the Emergency Department.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California.
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York.
3
Department of Emergency Medicine, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Lebanon, New Hampshire.
4
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, California.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This review provides practicing emergency physicians updated information regarding point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) imaging of patients with suspected urolithiasis.

METHODS:

A PubMed literature search was conducted for articles published between January 1, 1996 and May 31, 2017 and limited to human clinical trials written in English with relevant keywords. High-quality studies identified then underwent a structured review. Recommendations herein are made based on the literature review.

RESULTS:

Two hundred seventy-two abstracts fulfilling the search criteria were screened and 10 appropriate articles were rigorously reviewed in detail. There were 8 prospective studies and 2 retrospective studies. Only 1 of them was a multi-institutional randomized trial. POCUS performed in the emergency department (ED) is moderately sensitive and specific in making the diagnosis of urolithiasis in symptomatic patients. Suspected urolithiasis patients evaluated initially with ED POCUS have complication rates compatible with those evaluated initially with computed tomography.

CONCLUSIONS:

POCUS has moderate accuracy in making the diagnosis of urolithiasis. Nevertheless, it may be safely used as a first line of imaging in ED patients with suspected symptomatic urolithiaisis.

KEYWORDS:

emergency department; kidney calculi; systemic review; ultrasonography

PMID:
29089155
DOI:
10.1016/j.jemermed.2017.09.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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